17th February 2019
Make a Donation

States struggling to distribute PLE exams

Author : Hellen Achayo | Published: 2 years ago

The Secretary General for Examination in the Ministry of General Education says some states have not been able to distribute examination papers to some primary schools due to logistical challenges.

Before the start of every Primary Leaving Examinations, each state is required to prepare its own exams, and then send it to the national ministry for verifications.

After verification, the National Ministry of General then sends it back to the states for distribution to schools in all the counties.

This process has resulted into late distribution of exam papers to schools in some of the 28 States.

Some State ministers of Education who spoke to Eye Radio said their schools are still receiving the papers.

The Secretary General for Examination in the Ministry of General Education, Mr. Lul Ruai says two separate timetables have been developed to accommodate the late delivery of exam papers to the schools.

He says the Primary Leaving Examinations were supposed to be conducted this week.

“Logistic [support] is now the only challenge, and that is why some of the states shifted [exams dates] from 5th of December up to the 12th of December,” said Lul.

South Sudan is yet to unify its examinations, making it difficult for leakages or for pupils to exchange notes in what may be considered as ‘cheating’ during national examinations period in other countries.

“We agreed that the [timetable of] examinations for primary to be divided into two…because the type of examination is separate; each state has its own exams different from the other. And those who are ready are sitting now,” Mr. Lul added.

Mr. Lul hopes that logistical challenges will be tackled when Primary Leaving Examination is unified.

Late last month, the Ministry of General Education in its annual review resolved that the exams will be unified by 2017.

For the last 10 years, South Sudan has not been able to unify its national examinations.

In neighboring countries like Kenya, exams are set by the National Examinations Council, which determines the rules for national exams to be observed by supervisors, invigilators, teachers and students.

Exams are made to commence at the same time countrywide to avoid irregularities.