15th December 2019
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Prof. Akech warns of industrial action

Author: Woja Emmanuel | Published: 4 weeks ago

Graduands at the 22nd Graduation Ceremony of the University of Juba, Saturday, Nov 16, 2019 | Credit | Alier Martin Garang

The Vice Chancellor of the University of Juba has warned concerned government institutions of industrial action over delay in implementation of the new salary structure for lecturers.

In July, the Council of Ministers approved a new salary structure for all the public university lecturers.

The increment came after years of public outcry over little pay for lecturers since the Pound lost its value and the economy worsened.

“The delay of the implementation of the new salary structure threatens the academic stability of our public universities with mass exodus of the staff of worse of an upset of industrial action,” Prof. John Akech said during the 22nd Graduation Ceremony of the University of Juba at the weekend.

However, President Kiir says his government is committed to implementing the new salary structure for all the public universities.

“We will review and improve the pay structure of the top and mid-level civil servants so that our civil servants are free to devote their whole time to serving the country and creating public value without worrying much about their basic daily needs and that of their families,” replied Kiir, who presided over the ceremony

According to the approved salary structure, a professor would be paid over 500,000 SSP and a technician would earn over 100,000 SSP per month.

This is a significant increase from the current structure where a professor earns an equivalent of $153 per month.

More lecturers have allegedly quit the profession due to the little – with some seen driving public service vehicles in the capital, Juba, as a new means of catering for their families.

Recently, President Kiir blamed salary payment delays on the ministry finance and economic planning.

Civil servants have not been paid for months despite daily oil production. According to the ministry of petroleum, the government roughly gets 165 million per month from oil sales.

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